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This is what I think Bush's Orthodoxy is.. he believes himself a revolutionary. - Squirrel Rose [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
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This is what I think Bush's Orthodoxy is.. he believes himself a revolutionary. [Feb. 19th, 2007|07:19 pm]
a.d.h.d ramblings and obsessions
Bush Compares Revolutionary, Terror Wars

MOUNT VERNON, Va. (AP) -- President Bush honored the 275th birthday of the nation's first president on Monday, likening George Washington's long struggle that gave birth to a nation to the war on global terrorism.

"Today, we're fighting a new war to defend our liberty and our people and our way of life," said Bush, standing in front of Washington's home and above a mostly frozen Potomac River.

"as we work to advance the cause of freedom around the world, we remember that the father of our country believed that the freedoms we secured in our revolution were not meant for Americans alone." ....

"On the field of battle, Washington's forces were facing a mighty empire, and the odds against them were overwhelming. The ragged Continental Army lost more battles than it won, suffered waves of desertions, and stood on the brink of disaster many times. Yet George Washington's calm hand and determination kept the cause of independence and the principles of our Declaration alive," Bush said on a clear but frigid day, speaking to several hundred people.

Mount Vernon is about 16 miles south of the White House. Bush traveled by helicopter.

"In the end, General Washington understood that the Revolutionary War was a test of wills, and his will was unbreakable," said Bush. "After winning the war, Washington did what victorious leaders rarely did at the time. He voluntarily gave up power."

Washington's retirement didn't last long, Bush noted.

"As president, George Washington understood that his decisions would shape the future of our young nation and set precedent. He formed the first Cabinet, appointed the first judges, and issued the first veto."

"Over the centuries, America has succeeded because we have always tried to maintain the decency and the honor of our first president," Bush said. ...



Poll sees hope in West-Islam ties

Most people believe common ground exists between the West and the Islamic world despite current global tensions, a BBC World Service poll suggests.

In a survey of people in 27 countries, an average of 56% said they saw positive links between the cultures....


Yet 28% of respondents told questioners that violent conflict was inevitable...

Asked twice about the existing causes of friction, 52% said they were a result of political disputes and 58% said minority groups stoked tensions.

Only in one country, Nigeria, where Christian and Muslim groups often clash violently, did a majority of those polled (56%) cite religious and cultural differences between communities as the root cause of conflict.


Poll results: Common ground or conflict?

Doug Miller, president of polling company Globescan, said the results suggested that the world was not heading towards an inevitable and wide-ranging "clash of civilisations".

"Most people feel this is about political power and interests, not religion and culture," he said.

He pointed to the polarisation of communities in Nigeria as a warning sign to others, but hailed the results from Lebanon, a country frequently caught up in conflicts.

Some 78% of Lebanese strongly believed West-East tensions were politically motivated, while 68% felt common ground could be found between the West and the Islamic world.

Minorities blamed
The BBC poll asked approximately 1,000 people in each of 27 countries three questions about their interpretation of the world they live in.

Most expressed the belief that ongoing clashes could be resolved without violent conflict.
Indonesia, home to the world's largest Muslim population, was the only nation where most people (51%) said violence was inevitable.

But the results showed that a significant minority of those polled appeared pessimistic about the future.

"There is clearly pessimism about the inevitability of events," Mr Miller added.

"But twice as many people believe common ground can be found. There are real opportunities for peacemakers here."

The most positive respondents came from Western nations, with 78% of Italians, 77% of Britons and 73% of Canadians saying it is possible to find common ground.

Many blamed intolerant minorities for fuelling disputes and disagreements.

Some 39% of all respondents said minorities on both sides were to blame.

Just 12% said mainly Muslim minorities were to blame, and only 7% pointed the finger at Western fringe groups.

This is just kind of an observation, but it seems many intellectual factions seems to be really re-thinking the revolution, but particularly the conservatives. Lately the liberals are starting to get into the game too particular in some areas with weird vibes where there isn't much difference between the groups and it's really the vibe I've gotten out of a lot of arguments lately. It also seems to be somewhat of a generational flavor, as it seems younger intellectuals are more optomistic and into civic involvement.

Of course most normal people aren't as political, which is probably good as it should reduce tensions. As wars are often conflicts dealing with power and influence it is important to believe that normal people will be more reasonable then their leaders.
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